Category Archives: Hedley Times

Lorraine Lance: Still Passionate About Hedley Heritage Museum

Lorraine Lance
Lorraine Lance

 

Sitting at a large wooden table in the log home of Eric and Lorraine Lance, I felt I had stepped back into an earlier time and a simpler way of life. Built by Eric, the home overlooks the Similkameen River just west of Hedley and allows an extensive view of the valley. It seems an appropriate home and setting for a deeply committed woman who has devoted years and much energy to preserving the area’s history.

As a young woman, Lorraine studied broadcast communications at BCIT. “My goal was to work in news reporting,” she said. When she and Eric moved to Princeton, he worked at the mine and she was employed by the Similkameen Spotlight. She wrote a column on pioneers and recalls interviewing the Rabbitts, a well known pioneer family in the area. She also served as assistant editor for a time.

For her it was “an extraordinarily interesting era.” The mine and mill were both expanding, Princeton was booming and housing was scarce. She remembers vividly living in a 40 foot trailer.

When they acquired the three acres on which they now live, they moved into a small rustic dwelling on the property. Eric began building the log house, at times with her assistance.

Lorraine says it was Ruth Dunham, a longtime Hedley area resident, who encouraged her to get involved with the group that wanted to start a museum. Ruth told her, “everyone can make a difference in the community. It’s your choice.”

Lorraine quickly caught the early vision. When she speaks now of the group’s efforts, it is with a rare passion known only to the totally committed. She explains that the group’s purpose was to preserve the unique heritage of the Hedley area by encouraging and participating in historic building restoration and site conservation. The 1983 Constitution expressed the founders desire to also foster the development of arts and crafts in the community. Initially they named the organization The Hedley Heritage, Arts and Crafts Society. In 1998 the name was changed to The Hedley Heritage Museum Society.

“I wanted to do the museum work,” Lorraine says with just a hint of regret, “but I was always slotted into fund raising.” Although this wasn’t her wish, she believed fervently in the society’s goals and pursued government grant opportunities with a relentless tenacity. She particularly recalls a $20,000 grant, which was used to buy the museum property. Also a Cultural Initiatives grant of $25,000, devoted to constructing the building.

It is evident that Lorraine feels immense respect for the founding group. “It was Helen Moore who gave us the idea,” she says. “She had common sense for what to do. She was the only one who had lived here during the mining days. She knew the history. If anyone can be called the saint of the museum, it is Helen.”

Bernice Hodges, an early proponent, now deceased, was a potter and artist. Vince and Audrey Flynn gave many hours to tracking down photos and obtaining permission to use them. Mike Sanford, a mining engineer, served as society president a number of years. His wife Debra was treasurer during that time. “It was a real team effort,” Lorraine remembers.

Presently Lorraine is dealing with a significant health challenge that prevents her from being active in museum work. Her passion is still evident, however. “The training of volunteers is important,” she says. “They need to understand museums don’t need a lot of heat. Lighting is critical. Pictures can be damaged by light. Only duplicates of pictures should be on walls. Also, water and museums don’t go together well.”

She believes a museum is important because it helps a community retain its sense of history. “It provides us with a better understanding of our rich and vibrant past,” she says.

 

 

Building A Healthier Community

 

Building a Healthier Community was the subject of a March 4 workshop facilitated by Betty Brown of Interior Health Authority.  Second of a year long series sponsored by Angelique Wood, RDOS Area G representative, the session dealt with Five Pillars: physical activity, healthy eating, tobacco reduction, healthy built environment and priority populations.  Wood said “the purpose is to examine ways for us to live healthier, more fulfilling lives in our community.”

Brown, an experienced discussion leader with an effervescent personality, skilfully guided the group of about two dozen in an animated exchange of suggestions, ideas and questions.

It was suggested at the outset there is a need for a better understanding of the make up of the Hedley population.  Some of the people, it was observed, may come to the community because they want to be left alone.  Others may not know how to participate in community life. To engage people effectively, it would be beneficial to have a greater awareness of the demographic breakdown.

Several individuals expressed a desire for more interaction with the Upper Similkameen Indian Band.  Discussion revealed considerable consensus on this and it was suggested community leaders initiate discussions with band leaders to foster cooperation on issues of common concern and interest.

Another item that generated a good deal of discussion was the need for a community newsletter.  Interest was strong and there is certain to be further consideration of this idea.

There was also general agreement that community organizations such as Hedley Historical Museum,  Seniors Centre, the Community Club, Hedley Grace Church and  Fire Department could work together to achieve common objectives such as generating income and attracting members.

In the committee discussions, two groups argued for a paid or volunteer coordinator to assist the community to achieve important objectives.  It was agreed that community organizations would be asked to send a representative to the next meeting.  One subject to be discussed is the former ball park, now Unity Park.  Work is needed to develop it into a community park with a walking trail and green space.

A pleasant surprise for participants was the presence of Sergeant Barry Kennedy of the Princeton RCMP Detachment.  He answered a number of questions, including what the force will do when small medical grow ops become illegal at the end of this month.  He replied that direction on this will have to come from Health Canada.

Angelique Wood commented after the workshop, “it is important that we come together as a group and share our resources, ideas and brilliance to create a new future for the health of our children and planet.  Although we didn’t agree on everything today, we listened to each other and as a group, we took some substantive steps in a positive direction.”

 

 

 

Benefits Of Small Town Living

When my wife and I moved from Abbotsford to Hedley a year ago, our friends couldn’t comprehend our reasons for turning our backs on the amenities and glitter of city life.  Living in a small community with no McDonalds, Starbucks and numberless quality restaurants, plus no Canuck games, nearby movie theatres or opera, was to them like departing from the known world.  They could not fathom an existence in a community with no doctors, banks, supermarkets, malls or automobile dealerships.
 
Moving to Hedley has made us aware of another way of living.  Instead of depending only on government agencies to look after them, people help each other.  If an elderly person needs a ride to see a doctor, almost invariably, someone offers to take them.  When a cancer patient needed financial assistance to travel to a specialist in Vancouver, there was a contribution box in the Country Market.  There seems to be an understanding that to survive as individuals and as a community, we need to be willing when help is needed. 
 
We have seen that there is a core group that strives to make Hedley an interesting, vibrant community.  One example of this is the pancake breakfast hosted by the members of the Hedley Seniors Center.  On the second Sunday of each month they invite the community to a breakfast of pancakes, eggs and sausages or bacon.  At $5 a plate it’s a delicious bargain.
 
This summer the Community Club again sponsored a barbeque and street dance.  Great food and wonderful music.  The band’s rendition of Johnny B. Goode wowed the crowd.  At only $10, it was another bargain we never encountered in the city.
 
In October the Hedley Museum Society sponsored a lavish Thanksgiving dinner. They spoiled us with turkey, ham, mashed potatoes, yams, pie, and more.
 
For some years the Hedley Grace Church has organized a bottle drive to send children to camp.  Throughout the year, people contribute bottles and cans, and sometimes money.  Twice a year the contributions are sorted and bagged at the fire hall.  This is done by church people, children who attend the camp, and others who consider it a good cause.
 
The Fire Department, like all the groups, is manned by hard working committed volunteers.  They practise every Tuesday evening to ensure the best possible skill and fitness level.
 
We love the abundant sunshine, enjoy the people and appreciate the clean air.  The amenities of the city we came from really cannot compare. These are just a few  benefits of small town living.

First Community Conversation A Huge Success

On February 10, Hedley’s Senior Centre was crowded with community leaders and advocates from Princeton to Penticton, Osoyoos and Kamloops.  They had come to hear Julie Fowler, executive director of the highly successful ArtsWells Festival.

It was the first in a series of “Community Conversations” organized by Angelique Wood, RDOS Director of Area G, and Kim English, a director of the Hedley Heritage Museum Association and Assistant Manager of the Grist Mill.

Purpose of the workshop, according to Wood was to “improve existing festivals and also to encourage networking among participants ”  She said “this type of meeting will enable us to form lasting bonds and grow our communities.”  English said she hoped people would hear something of value they could take back to their own community and apply there.

Fowler, who has been in Wells 10 years, told the group her passion is to support artists of all kinds. “I want to bring them together,” she said, “and I want to bring their art to the world.”

The Wells festival began small. “In the beginning we gave away a lot of tickets so people would come. And if an artist showed an interest we begged them to come. There was little money to pay them, but we did feed them.”

She advised her audience to use existing facilities and look for funding through corporate sponsorships and government grant programs, in addition to selling tickets.  “Publicity is important,” asserted Fowler.  ArtsWells has found the CBC to be helpful.

Fowler said last year the festival sold out and had about 2000 guests.  They require approximately 220 volunteers, most of whom come from outside Wells.  Many of the artists and guests stay in tents during the 4 day festival.  It is still “quite grass roots.”

Currently the Wells festival features over 100 musical performances on 12 stages.  It offers more than 20 different workshops teaching everything from Ukrainian dance to lyric writing, clowning and more.  Activities for children include a crafting station, a children’s stage and workshops geared towards children.

There are also screenings of independent films and local theatre productions.  A one minute play festival is always popular.  Added to this is a host of inter-genre literary performances and workshops, including story telling/writing, poetry and the unexpected.

Following Julie Fowler’s presentation,  Bob Nicholson of the Okanagan-Similkameen Conservation Alliance participated in a panel discussion. He spoke about the Meadowlark Nature Festival which takes place in Penticton.  It features hikes, history, wild life and much more.  Each year they have an artist paint a picture, usually of a Meadow Lark, and put it on t-shirts which are sold to raise funds.  “We could use more help,” he said, “including a few additional people on our board, and we need money.”  He expressed a desire to work with other groups.  “A lot of the power is already in this room,” he suggested.  “Often we don’t know who has the experience, knowledge and skills.”

At the end of the workshop there was palpable excitement and enthusiasm as attendees exchanged ideas and contact information.  Angelique Wood described the presentations as “inspiring”.  Another Community Conversation will take place in April at a date to be announced.

 

 

 

Committed Citizens Create A Vibrant Community

In mid-December, approximately a dozen highly committed members of the Hedley Senior Center worked feverishly to create a successful potluck experience for some 80 attendees. Very likely, similar events took place in other communities. And almost certainly, the number of guests far exceeded the number of those who organized the event and served. After the Hedley potluck, a member of the Senior Center said to me, “We’re getting old. We need younger bodies.”

Most small communities are kept alive by giving, participating citizens. For a community to be vibrant, it needs the ideas, energy, and skills of many people.

Having been active in volunteering roles most of my adult life, I know that when we give our time and talents to society, we will almost certainly derive unexpected benefits. We gain new skills and experiences. We meet other active people. My wife and I have gained close friends through volunteering. And the sense of satisfaction and fulfillment that comes from giving far exceeds any monetary value.

Community organizations can only survive and thrive if people participate. If everyone does something, no one needs to do it all. And by making a contribution now, we will pass on to our children a more interesting, compassionate and cohesive community.

A decision to volunteer would make a worthy New Years Resolution.